Tags: Line Follower, 8 channels, Infrared, Tracking, Detection, Sensor, robotics, Obstacle Avoidance

Line Follower 8-channel Infrared Tracking Detection Sensor QTR-8RC Red

  • 49.00 AED
    • Ex Tax:49.00 AED
    • Product Code:
    • Availability: In Stock
    This sensor module has 8 IR LED/phototransistor pairs mounted on a 0.375" pitch, making it a great detector for a line-following robot. Pairs of LEDs are arranged in series to halve current consumption, and a MOSFET allows the LEDs to be turned off for additional sensing or power-savings options. Ea..

    This sensor module has 8 IR LED/phototransistor pairs mounted on a 0.375" pitch, making it a great detector for a line-following robot. Pairs of LEDs are arranged in series to halve current consumption, and a MOSFET allows the LEDs to be turned off for additional sensing or power-savings options. Each sensor provides a separate digital I/O-measurable output.

    Note: The QTR-8RC reflectance sensor array requires digital I/O lines to take readings. 

    Functional Description:


    The QTR-8RC reflectance sensor array is intended as a line sensor, but it can be used as a general-purpose proximity or reflectance sensor. The module is a convenient carrier for eight IR emitter and receiver (phototransistor) pairs evenly spaced at intervals of 0.375" (9.525 mm). Each phototransistor uses a capacitor discharge circuit that allows a digital I/O line on a microcontroller to take an analog reading of reflected IR by measuring the discharge time of the capacitor. Shorter capacitor discharge time is an indication of greater reflection.

    The outputs are all independent, but the LEDs are arranged in pairs to halve current consumption. The LEDs are controlled by a MOSFET with a gate normally pulled high, allowing the LEDs to be turned off by setting the MOSFET gate to a low voltage. Turning the LEDs off might be advantageous for limiting power consumption when the sensors are not in use or for varying the effective brightness of the LEDs through PWM control.

    The LED current-limiting resistors for 5 V operation are arranged in two stages; this allows a simple bypass of one stage to enable operation at 3.3 V. The LED current is approximately 20-25 mA, making the total board consumption just under 100 mA. The schematic diagram of the module is shown below  

    Specifications:

    • Dimensions: 2.95" x 0.5" x 0.125" (without header pins installed)
    • Operating voltage: 3.3-5.0 V
    • Supply current: 100 mA
    • Output format: digital I/O compatible
    • Optimal sensing distance: 0.125" (3 mm)
    • Maximum recommended sensing distance: 0.375" (9.5 mm)
    • Weight without header pins: 0.11 oz (3.09 g)
    • QTR-1RC output (yellow) when 1/8" above a black line and microcontroller timing of that output (blue).

    Arduino Library for  8-Bit Line Follower Sensor Module for Arduino:Click Here

    Arduino Code for Line Follower 8-channel Infrared Tracking Detection Sensor QTR-8RC :

    #include 
    
    // This example is designed for use with eight RC QTR sensors. These
    // reflectance sensors should be connected to digital pins 3 to 10. The
    // sensors' emitter control pin (CTRL or LEDON) can optionally be connected to
    // digital pin 2, or you can leave it disconnected and remove the call to
    // setEmitterPin().
    //
    // The setup phase of this example calibrates the sensors for ten seconds and
    // turns on the Arduino's LED (usually on pin 13) while calibration is going
    // on. During this phase, you should expose each reflectance sensor to the
    // lightest and darkest readings they will encounter. For example, if you are
    // making a line follower, you should slide the sensors across the line during
    // the calibration phase so that each sensor can get a reading of how dark the
    // line is and how light the ground is.  Improper calibration will result in
    // poor readings.
    //
    // The main loop of the example reads the calibrated sensor values and uses
    // them to estimate the position of a line. You can test this by taping a piece
    // of 3/4" black electrical tape to a piece of white paper and sliding the
    // sensor across it. It prints the sensor values to the serial monitor as
    // numbers from 0 (maximum reflectance) to 1000 (minimum reflectance) followed
    // by the estimated location of the line as a number from 0 to 5000. 1000 means
    // the line is directly under sensor 1, 2000 means directly under sensor 2,
    // etc. 0 means the line is directly under sensor 0 or was last seen by sensor
    // 0 before being lost. 5000 means the line is directly under sensor 5 or was
    // last seen by sensor 5 before being lost.
    
    QTRSensors qtr;
    
    const uint8_t SensorCount = 8;
    uint16_t sensorValues[SensorCount];
    
    void setup()
    {
      // configure the sensors
      qtr.setTypeRC();
      qtr.setSensorPins((const uint8_t[]){3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}, SensorCount);
      qtr.setEmitterPin(2);
    
      delay(500);
      pinMode(LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
      digitalWrite(LED_BUILTIN, HIGH); // turn on Arduino's LED to indicate we are in calibration mode
    
      // 2.5 ms RC read timeout (default) * 10 reads per calibrate() call
      // = ~25 ms per calibrate() call.
      // Call calibrate() 400 times to make calibration take about 10 seconds.
      for (uint16_t i = 0; i < 400; i++)
      {
        qtr.calibrate();
      }
      digitalWrite(LED_BUILTIN, LOW); // turn off Arduino's LED to indicate we are through with calibration
    
      // print the calibration minimum values measured when emitters were on
      Serial.begin(9600);
      for (uint8_t i = 0; i < SensorCount; i++)
      {
        Serial.print(qtr.calibrationOn.minimum[i]);
        Serial.print(' ');
      }
      Serial.println();
    
      // print the calibration maximum values measured when emitters were on
      for (uint8_t i = 0; i < SensorCount; i++)
      {
        Serial.print(qtr.calibrationOn.maximum[i]);
        Serial.print(' ');
      }
      Serial.println();
      Serial.println();
      delay(1000);
    }
    
    void loop()
    {
      // read calibrated sensor values and obtain a measure of the line position
      // from 0 to 5000 (for a white line, use readLineWhite() instead)
      uint16_t position = qtr.readLineBlack(sensorValues);
    
      // print the sensor values as numbers from 0 to 1000, where 0 means maximum
      // reflectance and 1000 means minimum reflectance, followed by the line
      // position
      for (uint8_t i = 0; i < SensorCount; i++)
      {
        Serial.print(sensorValues[i]);
        Serial.print('\t');
      }
      Serial.println(position);
    
      delay(250);
    }


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