Tags: High, Torque, Metal, Gear, Servo, G90s, -, Standard, Size

Servo Motor G90s Metal Gear High Torque- Standard Size

  • 39.00 AED

    50.00 AED

    • Ex Tax:39.00 AED
    • Brands techmaze
    • Product Code: Digital
    • Availability: In Stock
    The MG90S Servo motor is an upgrade over the very common and inexpensive SG90 in that it adds metal gears, a little better torque and overall more robust construction.These work well for basic servo experimentation and can be used in applications where small size is a virtue and that don’t require a..

    The MG90S Servo motor is an upgrade over the very common and inexpensive SG90 in that it adds metal gears, a little better torque and overall more robust construction.

    These work well for basic servo experimentation and can be used in applications where small size is a virtue and that don’t require a huge amount of torque, but they are still pretty strong.

    Servo motors can be commanded to go to a specific position and so are the usual go-to motor when accurate positioning is needed, such as for turning the front wheels on an RC model for steering or pivoting a sensor to look around on a robotic vehicle.

    Servo motors are comprised of a DC motor, gears, a potentiometer to determine its position and a small electronic control board.

    Standard servos have a specified limited range.  This is usually specified as 180 degrees.  Frequently the actual range is not quite the full 180 degrees and is limited by the mechanical gears and potentiometer used for position sensing that is contained in the device.  If the motor is run all the way to 0 or 180, it may start making unhappy sounds and start vibrating as it tries to drive to a position that it cannot get to.  This causes a high stall current condition and has the potential of stripping gears and damaging the motor, so it is best to either drive it to a safely reduced range such as 20-160 or experiment a bit to determine the actual usable range if you want to maximize the range.

    Servos expect to see a pulse on their PWM pin every 20mSec.  The pulse is active HIGH and the width of the pulse determines the position (angle) of the servos shaft.  The pulse can vary between 1mSec and 2mSec.  A 1mSec pulse positions the shaft at 0 degrees.  A 1.5mSec pulse positions the shaft at 90 degrees (centered in its range).  A 2mSec pulse positions the shaft at 180 degrees.  Pulses with values between these can be used to position the shaft arbitrarily.


    Motor Connections

    • Brown = Ground
    • Red = 5V
    • Orange = PWM Signal

    OUR EVALUATION RESULTS:

    In our testing these servos can lift about 3.75 lbs that is positioned on an arm 1 cm out from the shaft , so they are actually fairly strong little motors.  We also didn’t have any issues with the gears when pushed to their max.

    The servo runs on 5V with a current draw about 10mA at idle and 120mA to 250mA when being commanded to move depending on how it is being operated.  Current draw can get up to a maximum of 700mA under a stall condition.  One MG90S can typically be driven off the 5V power pin of an Arduino when experimenting as long as you don’t stall the motor, but motors in general are electrically noisy and power hungry devices.  It is always better to drive them directly off of a separate power supply rather than trying to power from the on-board Arduino regulator whenever possible

    • Power: 4.8V - 6V DC max (5V works well)
    • Average Speed: 60 degrees in 0.20 sec (@ 4.8V), 60 degrees in 0.16 sec (@ 6.0V)
    • Weight: 62.41g
    • Torque: At 4.8V: 8.5 kg-cm / 120 oz-in, and at 6V: 10 kg-cm / 140 oz-in.
    • Size mm: (L x W x H) 40.7 x 19.7 x 42.9

    Tags: servo; motor; robotics